Mike Zatezalo

My specialties lean towards rock, blues/R&B/soul and metal with maybe a little jazz and country thrown in for...

Sweep Arpeggio Exercise

Here is an exercise that focuses on two main concepts:  Arpeggios and Sweep Picking.

An arpeggio can basically be thought of as a chord with it's respective notes played separately as opposed to all at once.   So, instead of strumming the notes together, each note is sounded individually.

Sweep picking is a technique employed by guitarists of all types of genres that facilitates speedier playing moving from string to string.  It's particularly handy for use in playing arpeggiated lead lines.   It's called sweep picking because you typically move the pick across the strings in one continual direction as you move up and down, in a "sweeping" motion.   Meanwhile, you can use both your fretting and picking hand to try and keep the other strings from ringing out as you play each note. This ensures that the arpeggio sounds like a sequence of single discrete notes, rather than ringing chord tones.

 In this example, we move through ascending and descending arpeggios first going down the neck, and then sliding back up to a higher register.    Starting with a downstroke (v) and sweeping down through the strings, play the A major arpeggio shape shown in the tab  starting with the root on the 12th fret of the A string,   This particular arpeggio shape will be used for every arpeggio in this excercise except for the next two.   Play through the arpeggio with a down sweep until you get to the high E (12th fret, high E string).   Use an upstroke (^) for that note, and then a downstroke on the D note, 10th fret and pull of to the 7th fret B.  Then upstroke sweep back through the E dominant arpeggio shape ending on the G#  on the 11th fret, A string.    

You will continue a similar traversal from a picking perspective, as you move down acroos F#m arpeggio, E and D...and then again after sliding from the A note (5th fret, high E string) to the high E (12th fret).  Then slide up again from the A root (12th fret, A string) to D (17th fret) and finish the last two major arpeggios, D and E.

Start slowly and work it up to speed.  Because most of the shapes are the same, once you get the sweep picking coordinated and clean for one arpeggio, it should work similarly for the others.   The audio clip goes through the progression once slowly, and then once up to speed.

 

Here is an exercise that focuses on two main concepts:  Arpeggios and Sweep Picking. An arpeggio can basically be thought of as a chord with it's respective notes played separately as opposed to all at once.   So, instead of strumming the notes together, each note is sounded individually. Sweep picking is a technique employed by guitarists of all types of genres that facilitates speedier playing moving from string to string.  It's particularly handy for use in playing arpeggiated lead lines.   It's called sweep picking because you typically move the pick across the strings in one continual direction as you move up and down, in a "sweeping" motion.   Meanwhile, you can use both your fretting and picking hand to try and keep the other strings from ringing out as you play each note. This ensures that the arpeggio sounds like a sequence of single discrete notes, rather than ringing chord tones.  In this example, we move through ascending and descending arpeggios first going down the neck, and then sliding back up to a higher register.    Starting with a downstroke (v) and sweeping down through the strings, play the A major arpeggio shape shown in the tab  starting with the root on the 12th fret of the A string,   This particular arpeggio shape will be used for every arpeggio in this excercise except for the next two.   Play through the arpeggio with a down sweep until you get to the high E (12th fret, high E string).   Use an upstroke (^) for that note, and then a downstroke on the D note, 10th fret and pull of to the 7th fret B.  Then upstroke sweep back through the E dominant arpeggio shape ending on the G#  on the 11th fret, A string.     You will continue a similar traversal from a picking perspective, as you move down acroos F#m arpeggio, E and D...and then again after sliding from the A note (5th fret, high E string) to the high E (12th fret).  Then slide up again from the A root (12th fret, A string) to D (17th fret) and finish the last two major arpeggios, D and E. Start slowly and work it up to speed.  Because most of the shapes are the same, once you get the sweep picking coordinated and clean for one arpeggio, it should work similarly for the others.   The audio clip goes through the progression once slowly, and then once up to speed.

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