Consonant Intervals: 3rds & 6ths

 The distance between two notes is called an Interval. There are twelve notes in the chromatic scale which creates twelve possible intervals.

Let's take a look at the consonant or pleasant sounding intervals. They are the major and minor third and the major and minor sixth.

Each interval is shown as it appears on the piano. Then it is shown on the guitar neck in two ways.

* The first way shows the distance between the notes on one string.
* The second way shows how the interval would appear on separate strings. Try playing both notes at the same time to really get a feel for the sound they create together.

The Minor Third is the smaller of the two third intervals that occur in western music. It's sound is commonly used to express sadness in music. In this example the minor third occurs between C and Eb. The minor third is considered a consonant interval.

Learn to use the Minor Third interval for guitar

The Major Third is the larger of the two third intervals that occur in western music. It's sound is commonly used to express happiness in music. In this example the major third occurs between C and E. The major third is considered a consonant interval.

Learn to use the Major Third interval on guitar

The Minor Sixth is the smaller of the two sixth intervals that occur in western music. In this example the minor sixth occurs between the C and Ab. The minor sixth is categorized as a consonant interval, though in medieval times it was thought of as an unusable dissonance.

Learn to use the Minor Sixth interval for guitar

The Major Sixth is the larger of the two sixth intervals that occur in western music. In this example the major sixth occurs between the C and A. The major sixth is categorized as a constant interval, though in medieval times it was thought of as an unusable dissonance.

Learn to use the Major Sixth interval for guitar